2020 Drinking Water Quality Report

 

WALSH TOWN OF 2020 Drinking Water Quality Report
Covering Data For Calendar Year 2019

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Public Water System ID: CO0105900
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We are pleased to present to you this year’s water quality report.  Our constant goal is to provide you with a safe and dependable supply of drinking water.  Please contact DONNA PACKARD DAWSON at 719-324-5411 with any questions or for public participation opportunities that may affect water quality.    

General Information
All drinking water, including bottled water, may reasonably be expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants.  The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that the water poses a health risk.  More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the Environmental Protection Agency’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or by visiting epa.gov/ground-water-and-drinking-water.


Some people may be more vulnerable to contaminants in drinking water than the general population.  Immunocompromised persons such as persons with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, persons who have undergone organ transplants, people with HIV-AIDS or other immune system disorders, some elderly, and infants can be particularly at risk of infections.  These people should seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers.  For more information about contaminants and potential health effects, or to receive a copy of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines on appropriate means to lessen the risk of infection by Cryptosporidium and microbiological contaminants call the EPA Safe Drinking Water Hotline at (1-800-426-4791).


The sources of drinking water (both tap water and bottled water) include rivers, lakes, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs, and wells. As water travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it dissolves naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material, and can pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. Contaminants that may be present in source water include:


•Microbial contaminants:
viruses and bacteria that may come from sewage treatment plants, septic systems, agricultural livestock operations, and wildlife.
•Inorganic contaminants: salts and metals, which can be naturally-occurring or result from urban storm water runoff, industrial or domestic wastewater discharges, oil and gas production, mining, or farming.
Pesticides and herbicides: may come from a variety of sources, such as agriculture, urban storm water runoff, and residential uses.
•Radioactive contaminants: can be naturally occurring or be the result of oil and gas production and mining activities.
•Organic chemical contaminants: including synthetic and volatile organic chemicals, which are byproducts of industrial processes and petroleum production, and also may come from gas stations, urban storm water runoff, and septic systems.

In order to ensure that tap water is safe to drink, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment prescribes regulations limiting the amount of certain contaminants in water provided by public water systems.  The Food and Drug Administration regulations establish limits for contaminants in bottled water that must provide the same protection for public health.

Lead in Drinking Water
If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems (especially for pregnant women and young children). It is possible that lead levels at your home may be higher than other homes in the community as a result of materials used in your home’s plumbing. If you are concerned about lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking or cooking. Additional information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at epa.gov/safewater/lead.

Source Water Assessment and Protection (SWAP)
The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment may have provided us with a Source Water Assessment Report for our water supply. For general information or to obtain a copy of the report please visit wqcdcompliance.com/ccr.  The report is located under “Guidance: Source Water Assessment Reports”.  Search the table using 105900, WALSHTOWN OF, or by contacting
DONNA PACKARD DAWSON at 719-324-5411.  The Source Water Assessment Report provides a screening-level evaluation of potential contamination that could occur. It does not mean that the contamination has or will occur. We can use this information to evaluate the need to improve our current water treatment capabilities and prepare for future contamination threats. This can help us ensure that quality finished water is delivered to your homes. In addition, the source water assessment results provide a starting point for developing a source water protection plan.  Potential sources of contamination in our source water area are listed on the next page.

Please contact us to learn more about what you can do to help protect your drinking water sources, any questions about the Drinking Water Quality Report, to learn more about our system, or to attend scheduled public meetings. We want you, our valued customers, to be informed about the services we provide and the quality water we deliver to you every day.

Our Water Sources

Sources (Water Type - Source Type)

Potential Source(s) of Contamination

SOUTH CITY WELL (Groundwater-Well)
SCHOOL WELL (Groundwater-Well)
OLDCITY WELL AKA SHOP WELL (Groundwater-Well)

 

Other Facilities, Commercial/Industrial/Transportation, High Intensity Residential, Low Intensity Residential, Urban Recreational Grasses, Small Grains, Pasture / Hay, Deciduous Forest, Evergreen Forest, Road Miles

Terms and Abbreviations

  • Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) − The highest level of a contaminant allowed in drinking water.
  • Treatment Technique (TT) − A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water.
  • Health-Based − A violation of either a MCL or TT.
  • Non-Health-Based − A violation that is not a MCL or TT.
  • Action Level (AL) − The concentration of a contaminant which, if exceeded, triggers treatment and other regulatory requirements.
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level (MRDL) − The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants.
  • Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) − The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety.
  • Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level Goal (MRDLG) − The level of a drinking water disinfectant, below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants.
  • Violation (No Abbreviation) − Failure to meet a Colorado Primary Drinking Water Regulation.
  • Formal Enforcement Action (No Abbreviation) − Escalated action taken by the State (due to the risk to public health, or number or severity of violations) to bring a non-compliant water system back into compliance.
  • Variance and Exemptions (V/E) − Department permission not to meet a MCL or treatment technique under certain conditions.
  • Gross Alpha (No Abbreviation) − Gross alpha particle activity compliance value. It includes radium-226, but excludes radon 222, and uranium.
  • Picocuries per liter (pCi/L) − Measure of the radioactivity in water.
  • Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) − Measure of the clarity or cloudiness of water. Turbidity in excess of 5 NTU is just noticeable to the typical person.
  • Compliance Value (No Abbreviation) – Single or calculated value used to determine if regulatory contaminant level (e.g.  MCL) is met. Examples of calculated values are the 90th Percentile, Running Annual Average (RAA) and Locational Running Annual Average (LRAA).
  • Average (x-bar) − Typical value.
  • Range (R) − Lowest value to the highest value.
  • Sample Size (n) − Number or count of values (i.e. number of water samples collected).
  • Parts per million = Milligrams per liter (ppm = mg/L) − One part per million corresponds to one minute in two years or a single penny in $10,000.
  • Parts per billion = Micrograms per liter (ppb = ug/L) − One part per billion corresponds to one minute in 2,000 years, or a single penny in $10,000,000.
  • Not Applicable (N/A) – Does not apply or not available.
  • Level 1 Assessment – A study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system.
  • Level 2 Assessment – A very detailed study of the water system to identify potential problems and determine (if possible) why an E. coli MCL violation has occurred and/or why total coliform bacteria have been found in our water system on multiple occasions.

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Detected Contaminants

WALSH TOWN OF routinely monitors for contaminants in your drinking water according to Federal and State laws. The following table(s) show all detections found in the period of January 1 to December 31, 2019 unless otherwise noted. The State of Colorado requires us to monitor for certain contaminants less than once per year because the concentrations of these contaminants are not expected to vary significantly from year to year, or the system is not considered vulnerable to this type of contamination. Therefore, some of our data, though representative, may be more than one year old. Violations and Formal Enforcement Actions, if any, are reported in the next section of this report.

Note: Only detected contaminants sampled within the last 5 years appear in this report. If no tables appear in this section then no contaminants were detected in the last round of monitoring.

Disinfectants Sampled in the Distribution System
TT Requirement: At least 95% of samples per period (month or quarter) must be at least 0.2 ppm OR
If sample size is less than 40 no more than 1 sample is below 0.2 ppm
Typical Sources: Water additive used to control microbes

Disinfectant Name

Time Period

Results

Number of Samples Below Level

Sample Size

TT Violation

MRDL

Chlorine

December, 2019

Lowest period percentage of samples meeting TT requirement: 100%

0

1

No

4.0 ppm

Assessments for Microorganism Contaminants Sampled in the Distribution System

Contaminant Name

TT Requirement

TT Violation

Total Coliform

We were required to conduct an assessment of our system due to one of the following:
More than 5.0% positive samples per period (If sample size is greater than or equal to 40)  OR
More than 1 positive sample per period (If sample size is less than 40) OR
Repeat samples not collected after positive sample.

No

Coliforms are bacteria that are naturally present in the environment and are used as an indicator that other, potentially harmful, waterborne pathogens may be present or that a potential pathway exists through which contamination may enter the drinking water distribution system. We found coliforms indicating the need to look for potential problems in water treatment or distribution. When this occurs, we are required to conduct assessment(s) to identify problems and to correct any problems that were found during these assessments.

During the past year we were required to conduct one Level 1 assessment(s).  One Level 1 assessment(s) was completed.  No corrective actions were required.

Lead and Copper Sampled in the Distribution System

Contaminant Name

Time Period

90th Percentile

Sample Size

Unit of Measure

90th Percentile AL

Sample Sites Above AL

90th Percentile AL Exceedance

Typical Sources

Copper

09/10/2019 to 09/10/2019

0.06

10

ppm

1.3

0

No

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; Erosion of natural deposits

Disinfection Byproducts Sampled in the Distribution System

Name

Year

Average

Range
Low – High

Sample Size

Unit of Measure

MCL

MCLG

MCL Violation

Typical Sources

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

2019

2.3

2.3 to 2.3

1

ppb

60

N/A

No

Byproduct of drinking water disinfection

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)

2019

12.4

12.4 to 12.4

1

ppb

80

N/A

No

Byproduct of drinking water disinfection

Radionuclides Sampled at the Entry Point to the Distribution System

Contaminant Name

Year

Average

Range
Low – High

Sample Size

Unit of Measure

MCL

MCLG

MCL Violation

Typical Sources

Gross Alpha

2019

11.63

11.63 to 11.63

1

pCi/L

15

0

No

Erosion of natural deposits

Combined Radium

2019

5.1

5.1 to 5.1

1

pCi/L

5

0

No

Erosion of natural deposits

Combined Uranium

2019

11

11 to 11

1

ppb

30

0

No

Erosion of natural deposits

Inorganic Contaminants Sampled at the Entry Point to the Distribution System

Contaminant Name

Year

Average

Range
Low – High

Sample Size

Unit of Measure

MCL

MCLG

MCL Violation

Typical Sources

Arsenic

2019

7

7 to 7

1

ppb

10

0

No

Erosion of natural deposits; runoff from orchards; runoff from glass and electronics production wastes

Barium

2019

0.04

0.04 to 0.04

1

ppm

2

2

No

Discharge of drilling wastes; discharge from metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits

Chromium

2019

3

3 to 3

1

ppb

100

100

No

Discharge from steel and pulp mills; erosion of natural deposits

Fluoride

2019

0.88

0.88 to 0.88

1

ppm

4

4

No

Erosion of natural deposits; water additive which promotes strong teeth; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories

Nitrate

2019

10.33

9.8 to 11

6

ppm

10

10

Yes

Runoff from fertilizer use; leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Selenium

2019

44

44 to 44

1

ppb

50

50

No

Discharge from petroleum and metal refineries; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from mines

Arsenic: while your drinking water meets the EPA's standard for arsenic, it does contain low levels of arsenic. The EPA's standard balances the current understanding of arsenic's possible health effects against the costs of removing arsenic from drinking water. The EPA continues to research the health effects of low levels of arsenic, which is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems.

Nitrate: Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a health risk for infants of less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant you should ask advice from your health care provider.

Synthetic Organic Contaminants Sampled at the Entry Point to the Distribution System

Contaminant Name

Year

Average

Range
Low – High

Sample Size

Unit of Measure

MCL

MCLG

MCL Violation

Typical Sources

Atrazine

2019

0.1

0.1 to 0.1

1

ppb

3

3

No

Runoff from herbicide used on row crops

Secondary Contaminants**
**Secondary standards are non-enforceable guidelines for contaminants that may cause cosmetic effects (such as skin, or tooth discoloration) or aesthetic effects (such as taste, odor, or color) in drinking water.

Contaminant Name

Year

Average

Range
Low – High

Sample Size

Unit of Measure

Secondary Standard

Sodium

2019

45.1

45.1 to 45.1

1

ppm

N/A

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Violations, Significant Deficiencies, and Formal Enforcement Actions

Health-Based Violations
Maximum contaminant level (MCL) violations:
Test results for this contaminant show that the level was too high for the time period shown. Please read the information shown below about potential health effects for vulnerable populations. This is likely the same violation that we told you about in a past notice. We are evaluating, or we already completed an evaluation, to find the best way to reduce or remove the contaminant. If the solution will take an extended period of time, we will keep you updated with quarterly notices.

Treatment technique (TT) violations: We failed to complete an action that could affect water quality. Please read the information shown below about potential health effects for vulnerable populations. This is likely the same violation that we told you about in a past notice. We were required to meet a minimum operation/treatment standard, we were required to make upgrades to our system, or we were required to evaluate our system for potential sanitary defects, and we failed to do so in the time period shown below. If the solution will take an extended period of time, we will keep you updated with quarterly notices.

Name

Description

Time Period

Health Effects

Compliance Value

TT Level or MCL

NITRATE

EXCEEDED THE MAXIMUM CONTAMINANT LEVEL

07/01/2019 - 09/30/2019

Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.

11 MG/L

10 MG/L

NITRATE

EXCEEDED THE MAXIMUM CONTAMINANT LEVEL

07/01/2018 - 09/30/2018

Infants below the age of six months who drink water containing nitrate in excess of the MCL could become seriously ill and, if untreated, may die. Symptoms include shortness of breath and blue baby syndrome.

11 MG/L

10 MG/L

Additional Violation Information

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

Describe the steps taken to resolve the violation(s), and the anticipated resolution date:  The nitrate level was lower than the maximum contaminant level (MCL) each subsequent quarter following the July 2018 violation, until July 2019 when the nitrate level again exceeded that MCL.  Nitrate levels can fluctuate throughout the year so this will likely be a re-occurring problem until a long-term solution is found.  The Town of Walsh is working to resolve this concern, but resolution will take time and money.  An engineering firm has been hired to address the nitrate levels at the South Well, but in the meantime, please consult your healthcare provider with any health concerns.

Non-Health-Based Violations
These violations do not usually mean that there was a problem with the water quality. If there had been, we would have notified you immediately. We missed collecting a sample (water quality is unknown), we reported the sample result after the due date, or we did not complete a report/notice by the required date.

Name

Description

Time Period

LEAD & COPPER RULE

FAILURE TO MONITOR AND/OR REPORT

07/01/2019 - 11/17/2019

LEAD & COPPER RULE

FAILURE TO MONITOR AND/OR REPORT

10/01/2019 – 11/17/2019

Additional Violation Information

Please share this information with all the other people who drink this water, especially those who may not have received this notice directly (for example, people in apartments, nursing homes, schools, and businesses). You can do this by posting this notice in a public place or distributing copies by hand or mail.

Describe the steps taken to resolve the violation(s), and the anticipated resolution date:  These violations were resolved on 11/17/2009 when Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment (CDPHE) approved the Town's original 10 lead & copper sampling sites, along with 10 new sampling sites that the Town was required to identify.

Formal Enforcement Actions

Status Date

Description

Associated Violations

2/26/2019

SFL - State Administrative Order/Compliance Order issued without penalty. An order issued by the Executive branch of the State government that orders the PWS to come into compliance or to undertake remedial actions. No penalty is assessed. (FRDS-DED 1/93)

NITRATE

Additional Enforcement Information

Explanation of the enforcement and the steps taken to resolve:  The Town of Walsh is working with EBH Engineering to address the Town's nitrate issue and develop a strategy to bring the water system into compliance with regard to nitrate levels.   Thus far, the Town has secured funding for a Rural Development (RD) Search Grant for the required  Preliminary Engineering Report (PER)  and Environmental Review so an application can be made for a  RD Grant/Loan to fund the water compliance project.  The PER was recently submitted to CDPHE for approval.  The completion date for the long-term compliance solution is estimated to be five years out, so the Town has also developed a plan to purchase and install a reverse osmosis unit as an interim measure to supply water in compliance with the nitrate limits until that time.  The plan for the interim measure was recently approved by CDPHE, and the reverse osmosis unit is being shipped at this time, so it should be installed and operational before the end of August at the latest.